Eastern Kentucky University

Poster Title

The Meaning and Function of Human Dignity within the Universal Human Rights Struggle for Freedom and Equality

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

Abstract

“Our dignity is more important than our lives” J. Steele (2008). The central goal of human rights has always been to respect and protect human dignity, equality and freedom for all human beings. Human dignity has not been fully defined in American policies, domestic laws or with respect to international law. A paradigm shift toward universal human rights in Europe, Germany, and Canada encourages international law with legal contributions toward human rights based on human rights convention. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and function of human dignity within the context of moral, political and legal realms and to trace the history of human dignity from the 18th century to the present day through various writings such as; The Bill of Rights, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948); The European Convention for the protection of Human Rights (1950) and current scholarly articles. Analysis included the use of Immanuel Kant’s ideal of intrinsic worth, the African American struggle for human rights, the shift from civil to human rights and the concept of full person identity. Research suggests that Europe now leads the international community toward human rights. Goldhaver (2007) suggests that since the time of President Carter the United States has been engaged in a period of silence with respects to human rights. Under the Bush administration the Geneva conventions were voided leaving thousands of captives without legal recourse. Torture tactics such as water boarding and psychological torture were reinstated with little emphasis placed on the dignity of the human being. The international community needs a system of justice that incorporates human rights into their legislation, policies and courts.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

The Meaning and Function of Human Dignity within the Universal Human Rights Struggle for Freedom and Equality

“Our dignity is more important than our lives” J. Steele (2008). The central goal of human rights has always been to respect and protect human dignity, equality and freedom for all human beings. Human dignity has not been fully defined in American policies, domestic laws or with respect to international law. A paradigm shift toward universal human rights in Europe, Germany, and Canada encourages international law with legal contributions toward human rights based on human rights convention. The purpose of this study was to examine the meaning and function of human dignity within the context of moral, political and legal realms and to trace the history of human dignity from the 18th century to the present day through various writings such as; The Bill of Rights, The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948); The European Convention for the protection of Human Rights (1950) and current scholarly articles. Analysis included the use of Immanuel Kant’s ideal of intrinsic worth, the African American struggle for human rights, the shift from civil to human rights and the concept of full person identity. Research suggests that Europe now leads the international community toward human rights. Goldhaver (2007) suggests that since the time of President Carter the United States has been engaged in a period of silence with respects to human rights. Under the Bush administration the Geneva conventions were voided leaving thousands of captives without legal recourse. Torture tactics such as water boarding and psychological torture were reinstated with little emphasis placed on the dignity of the human being. The international community needs a system of justice that incorporates human rights into their legislation, policies and courts.