Murray State University

Poster Title

Bisphenol A and Triclosan: Emerging Environmental Pollutants in Western Kentucky Watershed: Study 1: (Benningfield) Triclosan Concentrations in Western Kentucky Watershed

Institution

Murray State University

Abstract

Triclosan (2,4,4’-trichloro-2’-hydroxyphenyl ether) is considered as one of the emerging new pollutants in the environment. In this study, triclosan contamination levels were measured in water samples collected from Murray Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), Bee Creek, Clarks River and Kentucky Lake. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method was used to determine triclosan concentrations in the samples. The results revealed that detectable concentrations of triclosan were found in all samples analyzed. The concentrations of triclosan exhibited the following trend: Influent > Effluent > Downstream Bee Creek > Upstream Bee Creek ≥ Clarks River > Kentucky Lake (Hancock Biological Station site). Removal efficiency calculations revealed that about 40% of triclosan enter the receiving waters (Bee Creek). Clarks River and Kentucky Lake water samples contained relatively lower levels of triclosan than WWTP samples. For comparison, water samples from Mayfield Creek and Red Duck Creek were analyzed for triclosan concentrations.

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Bisphenol A and Triclosan: Emerging Environmental Pollutants in Western Kentucky Watershed: Study 1: (Benningfield) Triclosan Concentrations in Western Kentucky Watershed

Triclosan (2,4,4’-trichloro-2’-hydroxyphenyl ether) is considered as one of the emerging new pollutants in the environment. In this study, triclosan contamination levels were measured in water samples collected from Murray Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), Bee Creek, Clarks River and Kentucky Lake. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method was used to determine triclosan concentrations in the samples. The results revealed that detectable concentrations of triclosan were found in all samples analyzed. The concentrations of triclosan exhibited the following trend: Influent > Effluent > Downstream Bee Creek > Upstream Bee Creek ≥ Clarks River > Kentucky Lake (Hancock Biological Station site). Removal efficiency calculations revealed that about 40% of triclosan enter the receiving waters (Bee Creek). Clarks River and Kentucky Lake water samples contained relatively lower levels of triclosan than WWTP samples. For comparison, water samples from Mayfield Creek and Red Duck Creek were analyzed for triclosan concentrations.