University of Louisville

Poster Title

The Personal Experience of Completing a Motivational Interviewing Intervention in African Americans with Diabetes: Preliminary Findings

Institution

University of Louisville

Abstract

African Americans are disproportionately impacted by diabetes compared to their non-Hispanic white counterparts. Motivational interviewing (MI) has recently been used as a behavior counseling strategy among African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) to improve diabetes self-management practices. The purpose of this qualitative study is to address the personal experience of developing and implementing a self-management plan among African Americans with T2DM, who completed an MI intervention. One participant, randomly selected, participated in an initial interview and a validation interview. Preliminary findings indicated that the participant viewed MI as a valuable means of support and reported an increase in confidence related to diabetes self-management practices after completing the MI intervention. Additionally, it was found that support systems, especially from medical personnel, were important in helping African Americans with T2DM to make necessary behavior changes. Additional interviews and content analyses will be conducted in order to better understand the personal experience and effectiveness of the MI intervention.

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The Personal Experience of Completing a Motivational Interviewing Intervention in African Americans with Diabetes: Preliminary Findings

African Americans are disproportionately impacted by diabetes compared to their non-Hispanic white counterparts. Motivational interviewing (MI) has recently been used as a behavior counseling strategy among African Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) to improve diabetes self-management practices. The purpose of this qualitative study is to address the personal experience of developing and implementing a self-management plan among African Americans with T2DM, who completed an MI intervention. One participant, randomly selected, participated in an initial interview and a validation interview. Preliminary findings indicated that the participant viewed MI as a valuable means of support and reported an increase in confidence related to diabetes self-management practices after completing the MI intervention. Additionally, it was found that support systems, especially from medical personnel, were important in helping African Americans with T2DM to make necessary behavior changes. Additional interviews and content analyses will be conducted in order to better understand the personal experience and effectiveness of the MI intervention.