Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Stink Bug Species in Organic Blackberries

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

Stink bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) are pests of blackberries in Kentucky. These insects insert their proboscis into each drupelet and extract the juice, as well as leaving a foul odor and taste. Consumer demand for damage-free produce means that growers must use safe and effective management tactics for insect pests. Organic blackberry growers require sustainable and environmentally sound production methods to manage these insects. Spring-mowing of primocanes, on primocane fruiting blackberry varieties could avoid stink bug attack and delay fruit set. This is the second year of this study. In 2011, three replicate plots of each of two varieties, ‘Prime-Jim®’ or ‘Prime Jan®’ were initially mowed to ground level on April 16. Three replicate plots of each variety were then mowed a second time on June 24, 2011. Stink bugs were sampled weekly using stink bug traps as well as visual search methods. The green stink bug, Acrosternum hilare, was most abundant, followed by the brown stink bug, Euschistus servus. The one spotted stink bug, E. variolarius; twice stabbed, Cosmopepla lintneriana; and the rice stink bug, Oebalus pugnax were also caught. We caught more stink bugs using the visual search method than using stink bug traps.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Stink Bug Species in Organic Blackberries

Stink bugs (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae) are pests of blackberries in Kentucky. These insects insert their proboscis into each drupelet and extract the juice, as well as leaving a foul odor and taste. Consumer demand for damage-free produce means that growers must use safe and effective management tactics for insect pests. Organic blackberry growers require sustainable and environmentally sound production methods to manage these insects. Spring-mowing of primocanes, on primocane fruiting blackberry varieties could avoid stink bug attack and delay fruit set. This is the second year of this study. In 2011, three replicate plots of each of two varieties, ‘Prime-Jim®’ or ‘Prime Jan®’ were initially mowed to ground level on April 16. Three replicate plots of each variety were then mowed a second time on June 24, 2011. Stink bugs were sampled weekly using stink bug traps as well as visual search methods. The green stink bug, Acrosternum hilare, was most abundant, followed by the brown stink bug, Euschistus servus. The one spotted stink bug, E. variolarius; twice stabbed, Cosmopepla lintneriana; and the rice stink bug, Oebalus pugnax were also caught. We caught more stink bugs using the visual search method than using stink bug traps.