Northern Kentucky University

Poster Title

The Biovailability of Lactate Dihydrate and Calcium Lactate Monohydrate

Institution

Northern Kentucky University

Abstract

Athletes are continuously searching for an advantage over their competitors. A new ergogenic aid containing Lactate Dihydrate and Calcium Lactate Monohydrate has recently been touted in the mainstream sports media for performance enhancement. However, there has been no scientific evidence to support or refute these claims. Manufacturers of the supplement claim improved performance through increased energy and a decrease in lactic acid production. While energy is produced through the lactate shuttle system, availability as a substantial source of energy during exercise is questionable and not currently supported by existing research. Also, supplementing with external lactate should not directly affect lactate production in the body. In order for this supplement to increase performance it must be available within the system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of calcium lactate monohydrate and magnesium lactate dihydrate. Ten subjects (male = 7 and female = 3) participated in this study. Resting blood lactate was measured prior to ingestion of the ergogenic aid utilizing the Lactate Pro and a finger stick. After ingestion of the ergogenic aid subjects remained in a resting state for one hour, per manufacturer’s instruction to ingest one hour prior to competition. Upon completion of that hour resting blood lactate levels were measured again. Means for the two measures were compared utilizing a dependent T-test with significance set at P<0.05. There was no significant difference (P=.235) between pre (1.48±0.47) and post measures (1.61±0.53). Supplementation of lactate does not appear to significantly increase bioavailability.

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The Biovailability of Lactate Dihydrate and Calcium Lactate Monohydrate

Athletes are continuously searching for an advantage over their competitors. A new ergogenic aid containing Lactate Dihydrate and Calcium Lactate Monohydrate has recently been touted in the mainstream sports media for performance enhancement. However, there has been no scientific evidence to support or refute these claims. Manufacturers of the supplement claim improved performance through increased energy and a decrease in lactic acid production. While energy is produced through the lactate shuttle system, availability as a substantial source of energy during exercise is questionable and not currently supported by existing research. Also, supplementing with external lactate should not directly affect lactate production in the body. In order for this supplement to increase performance it must be available within the system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bioavailability of calcium lactate monohydrate and magnesium lactate dihydrate. Ten subjects (male = 7 and female = 3) participated in this study. Resting blood lactate was measured prior to ingestion of the ergogenic aid utilizing the Lactate Pro and a finger stick. After ingestion of the ergogenic aid subjects remained in a resting state for one hour, per manufacturer’s instruction to ingest one hour prior to competition. Upon completion of that hour resting blood lactate levels were measured again. Means for the two measures were compared utilizing a dependent T-test with significance set at P<0.05. There was no significant difference (P=.235) between pre (1.48±0.47) and post measures (1.61±0.53). Supplementation of lactate does not appear to significantly increase bioavailability.