Western Kentucky University

Poster Title

Graphene-based Hybrid Nanocomposites for Aerospace and Renewable Energy Applications: Interfaces and Nanoscale Morphology-Promoted Synergistic Effects

Institution

Western Kentucky University

Abstract

Hybrid nanocomposites are an interesting class of nanomaterials offering multifunctionality tailored at the interface of the individual component materials. Graphene is a one-atom thick sheet with honeycomb lattice and much-pursued worldwide attributed to their extraordinary multitude of physical properties. While limited by themselves due to aggregation and local topological imperfections, it lends an opportunity to combine with other nanoscale organic (intrinsically conducting polymers) and inorganic (mesoporous silicon and transition metal oxides) materials. Their interactions allow for emergent novel materials and architectures with tunable properties (higher specific surface area, mechanical strength, and higher electron mobility and conductivity permitting facile electron and ion transport for electrochemical electrodes) for a gamut of industries. It also promotes nanoscale morphology, interfacial bonding and polymeric chain ordering, creates tailored interfaces, and correspondingly enhances mechanical and electrochemical energy conversion and storage functions synergistically for aerospace, defense and renewable energy sector. This work was comprised of three distinct parts: (1) development of ‘smart’ hybrid composites combining graphene oxide; GO and electrochemically reduced GO; ErGO and electrochemically polymerized polypyrrole; PPy and polyaniline; PAni using layer-by-layer approach resulting in PPy/GO, PPy/ErGO, PAni/GO and PAni/ErGO; (2) graphene-encapsulated mesoporous silicon anodes for Li-ion batteries accommodating large volume changes during charging/discharging; and (3) synthesizing graphene-decorated vanadium pentaoxide (V2O5) nanobelts (GVNBs) composites via hydrothermal method in one-step approach as hybrid supercapacitive cathodes. The knowledge gained from each of these research projects can tap into 3D printable graphene composites toward advanced manufacturing, next-generation high energy and power density electrodes for portable electronics, automotive and aerospace technologies. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support in parts by NSF KY EPSCoR, Ogden College and WKU Research Foundation.

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Graphene-based Hybrid Nanocomposites for Aerospace and Renewable Energy Applications: Interfaces and Nanoscale Morphology-Promoted Synergistic Effects

Hybrid nanocomposites are an interesting class of nanomaterials offering multifunctionality tailored at the interface of the individual component materials. Graphene is a one-atom thick sheet with honeycomb lattice and much-pursued worldwide attributed to their extraordinary multitude of physical properties. While limited by themselves due to aggregation and local topological imperfections, it lends an opportunity to combine with other nanoscale organic (intrinsically conducting polymers) and inorganic (mesoporous silicon and transition metal oxides) materials. Their interactions allow for emergent novel materials and architectures with tunable properties (higher specific surface area, mechanical strength, and higher electron mobility and conductivity permitting facile electron and ion transport for electrochemical electrodes) for a gamut of industries. It also promotes nanoscale morphology, interfacial bonding and polymeric chain ordering, creates tailored interfaces, and correspondingly enhances mechanical and electrochemical energy conversion and storage functions synergistically for aerospace, defense and renewable energy sector. This work was comprised of three distinct parts: (1) development of ‘smart’ hybrid composites combining graphene oxide; GO and electrochemically reduced GO; ErGO and electrochemically polymerized polypyrrole; PPy and polyaniline; PAni using layer-by-layer approach resulting in PPy/GO, PPy/ErGO, PAni/GO and PAni/ErGO; (2) graphene-encapsulated mesoporous silicon anodes for Li-ion batteries accommodating large volume changes during charging/discharging; and (3) synthesizing graphene-decorated vanadium pentaoxide (V2O5) nanobelts (GVNBs) composites via hydrothermal method in one-step approach as hybrid supercapacitive cathodes. The knowledge gained from each of these research projects can tap into 3D printable graphene composites toward advanced manufacturing, next-generation high energy and power density electrodes for portable electronics, automotive and aerospace technologies. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support in parts by NSF KY EPSCoR, Ogden College and WKU Research Foundation.