Poster Title

Lung Cancer Prevention: A Review of the Literature

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Institution

University of Kentucky

KY House District #

27

KY Senate District #

27

Department

College of Nursing

Abstract

Introduction:

Lung cancer is almost completely preventable with the elimination of exposure to tobacco smoke and radon. There are over 210,000 people diagnosed with lung cancer in the US every year, resulting in over 157,000 deaths. Of these, it is estimated that 15,000 to 22,000 deaths are related to radon.

Purpose:

The purpose of the literature review was to look at the existing evidence pertaining to lung cancer and lung cancer prevention.

Results:

Using Cinahl, a search was conducted using the terms “lung cancer”, “radon”, “tobacco smoke”, and “prevention. The search using the key term “lung cancer” yielded 7,244 articles; “radon” yielded 176 articles; “tobacco smoke yielded 566 articles’ and “prevention yielded 34,723 articles. Because the number found was so large, individual searches were combined to narrow the findings. After combining “lung cancer” and “prevention” there was 53 usable articles found.

Conclusion:

In addition to information on the prevalence of lung cancer, the review identified recommended strategies for the prevention of lung cancer. Smoking cessation is highly recommended, as is elimination of exposure to secondhand smoke and radon. A possible teaching moment is to approach someone about smoking cessation and/or exposure to second hand smoke following an abnormal lung cancer screening or test result. This can be done in person, via telephone or social media, and through words of encouragement from family and friends. Additional methods are working to enact comprehensive smoke-free workplace laws and encouraging radon testing in the home.

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Lung Cancer Prevention: A Review of the Literature

Introduction:

Lung cancer is almost completely preventable with the elimination of exposure to tobacco smoke and radon. There are over 210,000 people diagnosed with lung cancer in the US every year, resulting in over 157,000 deaths. Of these, it is estimated that 15,000 to 22,000 deaths are related to radon.

Purpose:

The purpose of the literature review was to look at the existing evidence pertaining to lung cancer and lung cancer prevention.

Results:

Using Cinahl, a search was conducted using the terms “lung cancer”, “radon”, “tobacco smoke”, and “prevention. The search using the key term “lung cancer” yielded 7,244 articles; “radon” yielded 176 articles; “tobacco smoke yielded 566 articles’ and “prevention yielded 34,723 articles. Because the number found was so large, individual searches were combined to narrow the findings. After combining “lung cancer” and “prevention” there was 53 usable articles found.

Conclusion:

In addition to information on the prevalence of lung cancer, the review identified recommended strategies for the prevention of lung cancer. Smoking cessation is highly recommended, as is elimination of exposure to secondhand smoke and radon. A possible teaching moment is to approach someone about smoking cessation and/or exposure to second hand smoke following an abnormal lung cancer screening or test result. This can be done in person, via telephone or social media, and through words of encouragement from family and friends. Additional methods are working to enact comprehensive smoke-free workplace laws and encouraging radon testing in the home.