Poster Title

Aging and Caregiver Issues Related to New Trends of HIV

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Institution

Western Kentucky University

KY House District #

CD 1

KY Senate District #

12,8

Department

Department of Public Health

Abstract

Introduction

Tanzania is one of the sub-Saharan countries that has been greatly impacted by HIV/AIDS since it emerged in early 1980s. Due to this impact, and over time, there is an important meaning attached to the terms “aging adults” and “caregivers” in the community.

Purpose

The aim of this study was to assess behavior, knowledge, and attitudes on HIV among providers and caregivers aged 50 and older and to determine measures caregivers and providers in this age group need to take to protect themselves against acquiring HIV infection while in the process of care.

Participants and Results

The study was conducted for five weeks during the summer of 2016 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The data was collected from formal providers (non-governmental organization, WAMATA and community hospital) and informal providers or caregivers based on voluntary surveys. The data showed that providers, both formal and informal, had provided care to about four HIV/AIDS patients in the past six months. Over 40% of the participants indicated they were not sure if a provider or caregiver can get infected with the disease while caring for a patient. More than 80% of the providers pointed out blood was the type of fluid they came in contact most frequently while caring for patients. Overall, two of the 22 providers (9%) reported to have acquired HIV in the process of care. Finally, only 55% of the providers/caregivers felt adequately prepared to interact with HIV patients in the process of care.

Conclusion

Older adults providing care for HIV/AIDS patients constitute an important group of caregivers supplementing HIV care. Our results suggested the importance of continued education and training that should be specifically designed to meet the needs of older providers in both formal and informal settings to improve care and prevent provider infections while caring for patients.

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Aging and Caregiver Issues Related to New Trends of HIV

Introduction

Tanzania is one of the sub-Saharan countries that has been greatly impacted by HIV/AIDS since it emerged in early 1980s. Due to this impact, and over time, there is an important meaning attached to the terms “aging adults” and “caregivers” in the community.

Purpose

The aim of this study was to assess behavior, knowledge, and attitudes on HIV among providers and caregivers aged 50 and older and to determine measures caregivers and providers in this age group need to take to protect themselves against acquiring HIV infection while in the process of care.

Participants and Results

The study was conducted for five weeks during the summer of 2016 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The data was collected from formal providers (non-governmental organization, WAMATA and community hospital) and informal providers or caregivers based on voluntary surveys. The data showed that providers, both formal and informal, had provided care to about four HIV/AIDS patients in the past six months. Over 40% of the participants indicated they were not sure if a provider or caregiver can get infected with the disease while caring for a patient. More than 80% of the providers pointed out blood was the type of fluid they came in contact most frequently while caring for patients. Overall, two of the 22 providers (9%) reported to have acquired HIV in the process of care. Finally, only 55% of the providers/caregivers felt adequately prepared to interact with HIV patients in the process of care.

Conclusion

Older adults providing care for HIV/AIDS patients constitute an important group of caregivers supplementing HIV care. Our results suggested the importance of continued education and training that should be specifically designed to meet the needs of older providers in both formal and informal settings to improve care and prevent provider infections while caring for patients.