Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Institution

Murray State University

KY House District #

5

KY Senate District #

1

Department

Hutson School of Agriculture

Abstract

Soil Responses to Cropping Systems in Fredonia and Princeton Kentucky

B. Webster, I.P. Handayani, and B. Parr

Murray State University, Hutson School of Agriculture, Kentucky, USA

Abstract

Cropping systems in Kentucky are strongly dominated by corn, tobacco, soybeans and wheat. Various crop management practices affect soil properties resulting in different functional quality of the soil to support crop growth. Crop rotation and tillage practices influence soil properties, therefore understanding the effect of these practices is essential to maintaining optimal soil environment. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of various common cropping practices in western Kentucky on soil chemical and physical properties. In addition, soil samples from pasture and wooded areas collected to use as a reference for comparison among crop fields. There were five cropping systems identified, such as no till, till, non irrigated, irrigated fields and garden. Soils were sampled on October 1st, 2017. Undisturbed and disturbed samples were collected from the depths of 0-6 cm and 6-12 cm. Undisturbed samples were collected using soil core (ring sample), while disturbed samples were taken using hand trawl. The samples were kept in the refrigerator until analysis. The undisturbed soil samples were used to analyze bulk density, porosity, soil water holding capacity and soil water content at field capacity. The disturbed samples were used to analyze soil organic matter (SOM) and soil pH. The data show that the highest SOM content was found in no till with the lowest in till systems. Wooded areas provided the highest soil water holding capacity and soil water content at field capacity. Total pore spaces were found relatively high in the garden and wooded areas. In all fields, soil pH was considered desirable at the range of 6 to 7.5. In general, no till systems show stratification between depths in each measured soil property.

Keywords: Bulk Density, Porosity, Water holding capacity, Soil Organic Matter, Soil pH

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Soil Responses to Cropping Systems in Fredonia and Princeton Kentucky [Hybrid Poster 1-B]

Soil Responses to Cropping Systems in Fredonia and Princeton Kentucky

B. Webster, I.P. Handayani, and B. Parr

Murray State University, Hutson School of Agriculture, Kentucky, USA

Abstract

Cropping systems in Kentucky are strongly dominated by corn, tobacco, soybeans and wheat. Various crop management practices affect soil properties resulting in different functional quality of the soil to support crop growth. Crop rotation and tillage practices influence soil properties, therefore understanding the effect of these practices is essential to maintaining optimal soil environment. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of various common cropping practices in western Kentucky on soil chemical and physical properties. In addition, soil samples from pasture and wooded areas collected to use as a reference for comparison among crop fields. There were five cropping systems identified, such as no till, till, non irrigated, irrigated fields and garden. Soils were sampled on October 1st, 2017. Undisturbed and disturbed samples were collected from the depths of 0-6 cm and 6-12 cm. Undisturbed samples were collected using soil core (ring sample), while disturbed samples were taken using hand trawl. The samples were kept in the refrigerator until analysis. The undisturbed soil samples were used to analyze bulk density, porosity, soil water holding capacity and soil water content at field capacity. The disturbed samples were used to analyze soil organic matter (SOM) and soil pH. The data show that the highest SOM content was found in no till with the lowest in till systems. Wooded areas provided the highest soil water holding capacity and soil water content at field capacity. Total pore spaces were found relatively high in the garden and wooded areas. In all fields, soil pH was considered desirable at the range of 6 to 7.5. In general, no till systems show stratification between depths in each measured soil property.

Keywords: Bulk Density, Porosity, Water holding capacity, Soil Organic Matter, Soil pH

 

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