Poster Title

E-cigarette and Marijuana Safety: Nurses’ Perceptions

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Institution

University of Kentucky

KY House District #

75

KY Senate District #

75

Department

College of Nursing

Abstract

Background: E-cigarette (e-cig) and marijuana use has increased in recent years. Nurse’s perceptions are vital as they are on the forefront of patient care. There is limited data on healthcare providers’ views of the safety of e-cigs and marijuana, and none specific to nurses.

Aims: To determine differences in nurses’ perceptions of safety of e-cigs and marijuana compared with conventional cigarettes by their demographic characteristics.

Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted on data from a 24-item survey about perceived safety of e-cigs and marijuana compared to cigarettes, completed by nurses attending the AACN NTI Conference from 2014-2017 [N=1567]. Chi-squared test assessed differences in attitudes about safety by age, degree, location, and years of experience. P-values < 0.05 were statistically significant.

Results: Perceived safety of e-cigs was significantly different by generation (p=0.03), highest nursing degree (p=0.025), hospital location (p=0.001) and years of experience (p=0.023). Of those >65 years of age, 81.5% reported e-cigs as less safe than conventional cigarettes, as did those with doctoral degrees (75.9%), living in the Midwest (72.8%) and with >15 years of experience (69.3%). Nurses’ perceptions of marijuana safety were significantly different by generation (p<0.001), hospital location (p<0.001), and years of experience (p=0.002). Of those ages 45-65, 66.6% perceived marijuana as less safe than cigarettes, as did those in the Midwest (69.3%), and with >15 years of experience (66.9%).

Conclusions: Major gaps exist in the evidence related to nurses’ perceptions of the safety of e-cigs and marijuana compared with conventional cigarettes. Our findings support the literature: younger generations view e-cigs and marijuana as safer than older adults. Surprisingly, nurses living in the South perceived marijuana and e-cigs as safer than those in areas of the country where marijuana has been legalized. Our findings support the need for continuing education for nurses and further research in this area.

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E-cigarette and Marijuana Safety: Nurses’ Perceptions

Background: E-cigarette (e-cig) and marijuana use has increased in recent years. Nurse’s perceptions are vital as they are on the forefront of patient care. There is limited data on healthcare providers’ views of the safety of e-cigs and marijuana, and none specific to nurses.

Aims: To determine differences in nurses’ perceptions of safety of e-cigs and marijuana compared with conventional cigarettes by their demographic characteristics.

Methods: A secondary analysis was conducted on data from a 24-item survey about perceived safety of e-cigs and marijuana compared to cigarettes, completed by nurses attending the AACN NTI Conference from 2014-2017 [N=1567]. Chi-squared test assessed differences in attitudes about safety by age, degree, location, and years of experience. P-values < 0.05 were statistically significant.

Results: Perceived safety of e-cigs was significantly different by generation (p=0.03), highest nursing degree (p=0.025), hospital location (p=0.001) and years of experience (p=0.023). Of those >65 years of age, 81.5% reported e-cigs as less safe than conventional cigarettes, as did those with doctoral degrees (75.9%), living in the Midwest (72.8%) and with >15 years of experience (69.3%). Nurses’ perceptions of marijuana safety were significantly different by generation (p<0.001), hospital location (p<0.001), and years of experience (p=0.002). Of those ages 45-65, 66.6% perceived marijuana as less safe than cigarettes, as did those in the Midwest (69.3%), and with >15 years of experience (66.9%).

Conclusions: Major gaps exist in the evidence related to nurses’ perceptions of the safety of e-cigs and marijuana compared with conventional cigarettes. Our findings support the literature: younger generations view e-cigs and marijuana as safer than older adults. Surprisingly, nurses living in the South perceived marijuana and e-cigs as safer than those in areas of the country where marijuana has been legalized. Our findings support the need for continuing education for nurses and further research in this area.