Poster Title

Exploring Appalachia’s Self-Esteem and the Coping Methods Used When Presented with Discrimination

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Psychology

Minor

Asian Studies

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

KY House District #

29

KY Senate District #

3 & 4

Department

Psychology

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to validate the rejection-identification model among the Appalachians, and how perceived discrimination predicts their personal and collective self-esteem. In the present study, the proposed model tests the hypotheses that the rejection from a dominant group will result in a direct adverse effect on well-being, as well as positive effects that are mediated by ingroup identification and self-stereotyping. Participants were 197 undergraduate students, who were provided with several questionnaires in an online survey that was accessed through the SONA system. This is a prevalent phenomenon in the Appalachian culture, but no one has tested this combined model on the population previously. The current study displayed that while some pathways of the model were supported, such as the effects that discrimination and identify with one’s Appalachian culture. It seems that there may be other mechanisms at work when it comes to the Appalachian population and coping with discrimination.

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Exploring Appalachia’s Self-Esteem and the Coping Methods Used When Presented with Discrimination

The purpose of this study was to validate the rejection-identification model among the Appalachians, and how perceived discrimination predicts their personal and collective self-esteem. In the present study, the proposed model tests the hypotheses that the rejection from a dominant group will result in a direct adverse effect on well-being, as well as positive effects that are mediated by ingroup identification and self-stereotyping. Participants were 197 undergraduate students, who were provided with several questionnaires in an online survey that was accessed through the SONA system. This is a prevalent phenomenon in the Appalachian culture, but no one has tested this combined model on the population previously. The current study displayed that while some pathways of the model were supported, such as the effects that discrimination and identify with one’s Appalachian culture. It seems that there may be other mechanisms at work when it comes to the Appalachian population and coping with discrimination.