Poster Title

Assessment of learning styles and learning retention among the elderly population in Frankfort, Kentucky

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Agriculture, food, and environment

Institution

Kentucky State University

KY House District #

2

KY Senate District #

22

Department

Health science

Abstract

Abstract

With the advancement of medical knowledge in the United States, people are living longer; therefore, the elderly population is growing. Due to this change in age dynamics, designing efficient and effective systems for delivering health services to older people is needed. One of the main concerns is the development of positive nutrition and lifestyle education, since many older adults have not received proper health education throughout their lives. Consequently, they are unaware of what qualifies as healthy practices. Upon receiving healthy lifestyle and diet education, elderly persons are more likely to practice proper diet and lifestyle practices. With newly gained knowledge, the elderly can care for themselves, improve their health status, and avoid unnecessary and costly nursing homes, hospitals, or in-home assistance.

To fulfil this goal, educators must realize that older people do not learn the same way or process information the same as younger individuals. The elderly face many challenges, such as cognitive decline, chronic age-related diseases, and physical limitations including vision and hearing impairments. Educators must incorporate alternative teaching methods that can effectually engage and motivate elderly individuals to improve their diet and lifestyle habits. By using personalized learning methodologies that account for these physical, auditory, and visual impairments, through the use of: visual aids, loud speech, engaging games that correlate with lessons, and food demonstrations, we observed an increase in nutrition knowledge and diet modification attitudes. In conclusion, customized education is key for helping older adults maintain good health and independent functioning.

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Assessment of learning styles and learning retention among the elderly population in Frankfort, Kentucky

Abstract

With the advancement of medical knowledge in the United States, people are living longer; therefore, the elderly population is growing. Due to this change in age dynamics, designing efficient and effective systems for delivering health services to older people is needed. One of the main concerns is the development of positive nutrition and lifestyle education, since many older adults have not received proper health education throughout their lives. Consequently, they are unaware of what qualifies as healthy practices. Upon receiving healthy lifestyle and diet education, elderly persons are more likely to practice proper diet and lifestyle practices. With newly gained knowledge, the elderly can care for themselves, improve their health status, and avoid unnecessary and costly nursing homes, hospitals, or in-home assistance.

To fulfil this goal, educators must realize that older people do not learn the same way or process information the same as younger individuals. The elderly face many challenges, such as cognitive decline, chronic age-related diseases, and physical limitations including vision and hearing impairments. Educators must incorporate alternative teaching methods that can effectually engage and motivate elderly individuals to improve their diet and lifestyle habits. By using personalized learning methodologies that account for these physical, auditory, and visual impairments, through the use of: visual aids, loud speech, engaging games that correlate with lessons, and food demonstrations, we observed an increase in nutrition knowledge and diet modification attitudes. In conclusion, customized education is key for helping older adults maintain good health and independent functioning.