Poster Title

XMM-Newton and VLA Observations of the Galactic Supernova Remnants G5.9+3.1, and G32.4+0.1

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

Major

Physics

Institution

Morehead State University

KY House District #

99

KY Senate District #

27

Department

Department of Earth and Space Science

Abstract

While nearly 300 supernova remnants (SNRs) are now known to exist in our Galaxy, only a tiny fraction of these sources have been studied in significant detail at multiple wavelengths. To remedy this situation and to improve our knowledge of general properties of SNRs and SNR-related phenomena, we are analyzing a sample of pointed archival X-ray observations made of poorly-studied Galactic SNRs with the XMM-Newton Observatory. We present here our analysis of two of the sources in our sample – G5.9+3.1 and G32.4+0.1 – for which we have obtained complementary archival radio observations made with the Murchison Widefield Array and the Very Large Array. Our initial analysis indicates that the X-ray emission from G5.9+3.1 is thermal in origin that varies widely in spectral properties across the angular extent across the SNR. In contrast, the X-ray emission from G32.4+0.1 appears to be synchrotron radiation from cosmic-ray electrons accelerated by the SNR.

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XMM-Newton and VLA Observations of the Galactic Supernova Remnants G5.9+3.1, and G32.4+0.1

While nearly 300 supernova remnants (SNRs) are now known to exist in our Galaxy, only a tiny fraction of these sources have been studied in significant detail at multiple wavelengths. To remedy this situation and to improve our knowledge of general properties of SNRs and SNR-related phenomena, we are analyzing a sample of pointed archival X-ray observations made of poorly-studied Galactic SNRs with the XMM-Newton Observatory. We present here our analysis of two of the sources in our sample – G5.9+3.1 and G32.4+0.1 – for which we have obtained complementary archival radio observations made with the Murchison Widefield Array and the Very Large Array. Our initial analysis indicates that the X-ray emission from G5.9+3.1 is thermal in origin that varies widely in spectral properties across the angular extent across the SNR. In contrast, the X-ray emission from G32.4+0.1 appears to be synchrotron radiation from cosmic-ray electrons accelerated by the SNR.