Poster Title

Men's Understanding of Toxic Masculinity

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Sociology

Minor

Social Work

Institution

Morehead State University

KY House District #

99

KY Senate District #

27

Department

Department of Sociology, Social Work, and Criminology

Abstract

Men’s Understanding of Toxic Masculinity

Cat Haggard

Bernadette Barton

Sociology, Social Work, and Criminology

Hegemonic masculinity, more colloquially referred to as toxic masculinity, is a set of practices that promote the dominant social position of men, and the subordinate social position of women. Toxic masculinity socializes men to see masculinity itself in hierarchical terms, ranking men according to how well they embody and present as the alpha male: the toughest, strongest, and least emotional. Researchers find that toxic masculinity is responsible for a number of negative social consequences including dangerous risk-taking, acts of violence, and the numbing of empathy. Drawing on interviews with 10 male millennials, this research explores how aware men are of the concept and constraints of toxic masculinity while in college. We theorize time spent getting an undergraduate degree as a key turning point in men’s self-conception. Many men get to college and are enlightened by the openness and diversity among campus. This poster illustrates that young men have varying degrees of understanding of toxic masculinity, particularly as regards their own behavior. We find that subjects have an easier time seeing the negative consequences of toxic masculinity in others than themselves.

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Men's Understanding of Toxic Masculinity

Men’s Understanding of Toxic Masculinity

Cat Haggard

Bernadette Barton

Sociology, Social Work, and Criminology

Hegemonic masculinity, more colloquially referred to as toxic masculinity, is a set of practices that promote the dominant social position of men, and the subordinate social position of women. Toxic masculinity socializes men to see masculinity itself in hierarchical terms, ranking men according to how well they embody and present as the alpha male: the toughest, strongest, and least emotional. Researchers find that toxic masculinity is responsible for a number of negative social consequences including dangerous risk-taking, acts of violence, and the numbing of empathy. Drawing on interviews with 10 male millennials, this research explores how aware men are of the concept and constraints of toxic masculinity while in college. We theorize time spent getting an undergraduate degree as a key turning point in men’s self-conception. Many men get to college and are enlightened by the openness and diversity among campus. This poster illustrates that young men have varying degrees of understanding of toxic masculinity, particularly as regards their own behavior. We find that subjects have an easier time seeing the negative consequences of toxic masculinity in others than themselves.