Poster Title

A Brain-Friendly Approach to Music Literacy

Presenter Information

Taylor DavisFollow

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Music Education

Institution

Murray State University

KY House District #

1

KY Senate District #

1

Department

Music

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore how the brain processes information, stores it in long-term memory and then applies that knowledge to teaching music in a classroom/rehearsal setting. We observed how the working memory, the system responsible for processing information from short-term and long-term memory can function with greater efficiency. We observed how the number of items available for processing in the working memory may be increased through a process identified as “chunking.” Chunking is when short patterns, or bits of information, are combined to form longer sequences. When applying these brain-friendly learning concepts to music, the instructor taught a series of short tonal and rhythmic patterns, graduating in difficulty. These patterns were combined to form longer phrases of melody or rhythm. The short patterns were extracted from a selection of repertoire being sung by the choir. They were pre-taught during the music literacy component of the warm-up sequence at the beginning of rehearsal. Once the students had learned the patterns aurally and stored them in long-term memory, the patterns were quickly recognized when they appeared in the music, often aurally first. The repertoire became much easier for the children to comprehend. Thus, the choir quickly and efficiently learned the music and performed it with ease and aesthetic awareness. These patterns, stored in long-term memory, allow the working memory to access them later and apply them to other repertoire. This application of knowledge is called transfer and is a necessary part of the teaching and learning process.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

A Brain-Friendly Approach to Music Literacy

The purpose of this study was to explore how the brain processes information, stores it in long-term memory and then applies that knowledge to teaching music in a classroom/rehearsal setting. We observed how the working memory, the system responsible for processing information from short-term and long-term memory can function with greater efficiency. We observed how the number of items available for processing in the working memory may be increased through a process identified as “chunking.” Chunking is when short patterns, or bits of information, are combined to form longer sequences. When applying these brain-friendly learning concepts to music, the instructor taught a series of short tonal and rhythmic patterns, graduating in difficulty. These patterns were combined to form longer phrases of melody or rhythm. The short patterns were extracted from a selection of repertoire being sung by the choir. They were pre-taught during the music literacy component of the warm-up sequence at the beginning of rehearsal. Once the students had learned the patterns aurally and stored them in long-term memory, the patterns were quickly recognized when they appeared in the music, often aurally first. The repertoire became much easier for the children to comprehend. Thus, the choir quickly and efficiently learned the music and performed it with ease and aesthetic awareness. These patterns, stored in long-term memory, allow the working memory to access them later and apply them to other repertoire. This application of knowledge is called transfer and is a necessary part of the teaching and learning process.