Poster Title

Are dietary factors and exercise levels related to fertility status?

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nutrition and Dietetics

Institution

Western Kentucky University

KY House District #

39

KY Senate District #

22

Department

Kinesiology and Recreational Sport and Nutrition and Dietetics

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Infertility is a major public health concern as it affects up to 25% of couples in Western Countries. While there is some evidence that diet and exercise may be linked to fertility, there is no official dietary or exercise guidance for couples when trying to conceive. Additional information regarding the relationship between diet, exercise, and fertility is needed to better inform the development of guidelines for couples trying to conceive.

PURPOSE: To examine the relationships between diet, exercise, and fertility among women.

METHODS: Participants were selected from on ongoing pregnancy study (N=33). All participants went on to have healthy pregnancies. Participants completed a survey regarding how long it took them to conceive, what methods they had to employ, if they ever had to seek treatment, and any other pertinent information regarding their fertility status prior to conception. In addition, they were asked detailed information regarding their dietary and exercise habits while trying to conceive. In addition, information on their significant other was collected.

RESULTS: The amount of time it took to conceive (TTC) ranged from 1 month to 6 years. TTC and sedentary time were positively correlated (r=0.569, p=0.002), while light, moderate, and vigorous activities were not correlated to TTC. Regarding diet, TTC was positively correlated with total calories consumed (r=0.376, p=0.048) and total carbohydrates consumed (r=0.716, p<0.001).

CONCLUSION: Women hoping to conceive should consider decreasing time spent sedentary as well as their total caloric intake and total carbohydrate intake in order to conceive sooner. This study supports the idea that diet, activity level (or lack thereof), and fertility status may all be closely related. These topics should be carefully discussed with a health care provider when trying to conceive.

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Are dietary factors and exercise levels related to fertility status?

BACKGROUND: Infertility is a major public health concern as it affects up to 25% of couples in Western Countries. While there is some evidence that diet and exercise may be linked to fertility, there is no official dietary or exercise guidance for couples when trying to conceive. Additional information regarding the relationship between diet, exercise, and fertility is needed to better inform the development of guidelines for couples trying to conceive.

PURPOSE: To examine the relationships between diet, exercise, and fertility among women.

METHODS: Participants were selected from on ongoing pregnancy study (N=33). All participants went on to have healthy pregnancies. Participants completed a survey regarding how long it took them to conceive, what methods they had to employ, if they ever had to seek treatment, and any other pertinent information regarding their fertility status prior to conception. In addition, they were asked detailed information regarding their dietary and exercise habits while trying to conceive. In addition, information on their significant other was collected.

RESULTS: The amount of time it took to conceive (TTC) ranged from 1 month to 6 years. TTC and sedentary time were positively correlated (r=0.569, p=0.002), while light, moderate, and vigorous activities were not correlated to TTC. Regarding diet, TTC was positively correlated with total calories consumed (r=0.376, p=0.048) and total carbohydrates consumed (r=0.716, p<0.001).

CONCLUSION: Women hoping to conceive should consider decreasing time spent sedentary as well as their total caloric intake and total carbohydrate intake in order to conceive sooner. This study supports the idea that diet, activity level (or lack thereof), and fertility status may all be closely related. These topics should be carefully discussed with a health care provider when trying to conceive.