Poster Title

Differences in Consumer Acceptance and Perception of Brassica oleracea, variety acephala (Kale) Produced under Field, Greenhouse, and Artificial Lighting Conditions

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Animal Tech/Equine Science

Institution

Murray State University

KY House District #

5

KY Senate District #

1

Department

Agriculture Science

Abstract

Kale is a cruciferous vegetable related to broccoli and cabbage. In recent years it has been labeled a “superfood” and has seen an increase in popularity and consumption. With the increase in consumption, an increased interest in developing production methods to extend the growing season has developed. It is unknown what impact these alternative production methods will have on the consumer acceptance of prepared kale.

For this cross-disciplinary research endeavor, researchers grew kale under three different growing conditions: greenhouse, artificial lights, and outdoor production. All kale was grown in USDA Plant Hardiness Zone 7a during the fall and winter months. This research was approved by the Murray State University IRB.

At maturity, kale will be harvested and prepared by nutrition and dietetics students in a commercial kitchen. Prepared samples of each kale treatment will be presented to a panel of untrained panelists. Panelists will evaluate each kale sample based on color, texture, flavor, and overall impression on a paper-based instrument consisting of Likert and open-ended items.

Results of this work will be used to inform best practices for increasing quality and consumer acceptance of kale produced in USDA Hardiness Zone 7a.

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Differences in Consumer Acceptance and Perception of Brassica oleracea, variety acephala (Kale) Produced under Field, Greenhouse, and Artificial Lighting Conditions

Kale is a cruciferous vegetable related to broccoli and cabbage. In recent years it has been labeled a “superfood” and has seen an increase in popularity and consumption. With the increase in consumption, an increased interest in developing production methods to extend the growing season has developed. It is unknown what impact these alternative production methods will have on the consumer acceptance of prepared kale.

For this cross-disciplinary research endeavor, researchers grew kale under three different growing conditions: greenhouse, artificial lights, and outdoor production. All kale was grown in USDA Plant Hardiness Zone 7a during the fall and winter months. This research was approved by the Murray State University IRB.

At maturity, kale will be harvested and prepared by nutrition and dietetics students in a commercial kitchen. Prepared samples of each kale treatment will be presented to a panel of untrained panelists. Panelists will evaluate each kale sample based on color, texture, flavor, and overall impression on a paper-based instrument consisting of Likert and open-ended items.

Results of this work will be used to inform best practices for increasing quality and consumer acceptance of kale produced in USDA Hardiness Zone 7a.