Poster Title

Glovebox for Experimentation in Reduced Gravity and Other Extreme Environments

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Bioengneering

Minor

Mathematics and Physics

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

2nd Student Major

Biology and Psychology

3rd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

3rd Student Major

Bioengineering

4th Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

4th Student Major

Bioengineering

5th Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

5th Student Major

Bioengineering

Institution

University of Louisville

KY House District #

41; 31; 36; 59

KY Senate District #

35; 20; 26

Department

Department of Cardiovascular and Cardiothoracic Surgery; Department of Bioengineering; Department of Biology

Abstract

Through parabolic and suborbital research flights, fluid mechanics, biological systems and other experimental topics can be investigated in reduced gravity. When testing under such extreme conditions, a secondary containment is needed in order to keep experimental and potentially hazardous material from floating freely through the aircraft; this stimulated the need for a flight research glovebox. The initial version of the research glovebox was adapted from a neonatal intensive-care incubator which was used on 18 parabolic flights. With the advent of research during suborbital flight opportunities, the glovebox needed to be redesigned to become a more compact and capable containment chamber. To meet this objective, a smaller, lighter glovebox was designed and constructed. By using aluminum and transparent polycarbonate, the weight of the glovebox was reduced to only 35 lbs. Based on current guidelines for experimental suborbital flights, this allows for 65 lbs. of experimental equipment. Mimicking the original glovebox, two side doors that fold down were implemented. These would allow for placing the experiment in the glovebox, proper fastening and easy removal of the experiment. During experimentation, arm access through ports with surgical gown sleeves allow for sample manipulation without the risk of experimental particulates leaving the glovebox, while allowing for up to three investigators to work inside the glovebox at once. Using a stand and mounting board, the experiment can be held at a comfortable height, provides feet restraints for investigators, and allows for attachment to the aircraft for parabolic and suborbital flights. This set-up has been implemented when testing a new surgical fluid-management system, leak-free surgical trocars, and rehydration of red blood cells for transfusion therapy during spaceflight. This glovebox will be able to provide an effective secondary containment for reduced gravity test conditions, as well as other extreme environment test conditions. (Supported by NASA-80NSSC18K1664 and NASA-NNX16AC59G).

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Glovebox for Experimentation in Reduced Gravity and Other Extreme Environments

Through parabolic and suborbital research flights, fluid mechanics, biological systems and other experimental topics can be investigated in reduced gravity. When testing under such extreme conditions, a secondary containment is needed in order to keep experimental and potentially hazardous material from floating freely through the aircraft; this stimulated the need for a flight research glovebox. The initial version of the research glovebox was adapted from a neonatal intensive-care incubator which was used on 18 parabolic flights. With the advent of research during suborbital flight opportunities, the glovebox needed to be redesigned to become a more compact and capable containment chamber. To meet this objective, a smaller, lighter glovebox was designed and constructed. By using aluminum and transparent polycarbonate, the weight of the glovebox was reduced to only 35 lbs. Based on current guidelines for experimental suborbital flights, this allows for 65 lbs. of experimental equipment. Mimicking the original glovebox, two side doors that fold down were implemented. These would allow for placing the experiment in the glovebox, proper fastening and easy removal of the experiment. During experimentation, arm access through ports with surgical gown sleeves allow for sample manipulation without the risk of experimental particulates leaving the glovebox, while allowing for up to three investigators to work inside the glovebox at once. Using a stand and mounting board, the experiment can be held at a comfortable height, provides feet restraints for investigators, and allows for attachment to the aircraft for parabolic and suborbital flights. This set-up has been implemented when testing a new surgical fluid-management system, leak-free surgical trocars, and rehydration of red blood cells for transfusion therapy during spaceflight. This glovebox will be able to provide an effective secondary containment for reduced gravity test conditions, as well as other extreme environment test conditions. (Supported by NASA-80NSSC18K1664 and NASA-NNX16AC59G).