Poster Title

Students Stomp Stigma

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Institution

Northern Kentucky University

KY House District #

4

KY Senate District #

24

Department

School of Nursing

Abstract

Students Stomp Stigma

Erika Owens, Rachael Owens, Eric Riehle, Hannah Tucker

Faculty: Jillian Boyle MSN, RN, SANE

Northern Kentucky University, Department of Health and Human Services: School of Nursing The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to determine whether direct exposure for students in healthcare professions to People who Inject Drugs (PWID), would reduce the stigma and bias associated with Syringe Service Programs. The project stemmed from observable bias identified by students in their undergraduate nursing program caring for patients in the clinical setting who suffer from addiction. With nurses most often being the faces of the healthcare system, it is important that the disease of addiction is better understood across the profession. Methods used to conduct this literature review included using keywords and databases such as CINAHL, GoogleScholar, and EBSCOHost. The literature suggests that by improving relations with PWID through increased exposure and hands-on interaction via a community-based clinical experience, a subsequent reduction in stigma is associated with these patients and SSPs. In addition, it suggests the potential for increased utilization of Syringe Service Programs. Through the use of pre- and post-questionnaires, multiple studies found clinical exposure improved students’ attitudes towards PWID. While available research shows the benefits of direct exposure, larger studies need to be conducted and the practices more widely implemented to identify the most impactful duration of exposure to generate the greatest benefit for students across all healthcare professions.

Keywords: syringe service program (SSP), people who inject drugs (PWID), stigma, healthcare students

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Students Stomp Stigma

Students Stomp Stigma

Erika Owens, Rachael Owens, Eric Riehle, Hannah Tucker

Faculty: Jillian Boyle MSN, RN, SANE

Northern Kentucky University, Department of Health and Human Services: School of Nursing The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to determine whether direct exposure for students in healthcare professions to People who Inject Drugs (PWID), would reduce the stigma and bias associated with Syringe Service Programs. The project stemmed from observable bias identified by students in their undergraduate nursing program caring for patients in the clinical setting who suffer from addiction. With nurses most often being the faces of the healthcare system, it is important that the disease of addiction is better understood across the profession. Methods used to conduct this literature review included using keywords and databases such as CINAHL, GoogleScholar, and EBSCOHost. The literature suggests that by improving relations with PWID through increased exposure and hands-on interaction via a community-based clinical experience, a subsequent reduction in stigma is associated with these patients and SSPs. In addition, it suggests the potential for increased utilization of Syringe Service Programs. Through the use of pre- and post-questionnaires, multiple studies found clinical exposure improved students’ attitudes towards PWID. While available research shows the benefits of direct exposure, larger studies need to be conducted and the practices more widely implemented to identify the most impactful duration of exposure to generate the greatest benefit for students across all healthcare professions.

Keywords: syringe service program (SSP), people who inject drugs (PWID), stigma, healthcare students