Morehead State University

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

Major

Computer Science

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Sophomore

2nd Student Major

Computer Science

Institution 22-23

Morehead State University

KY House District #

KY-103515000

KY Senate District #

14

Department

Education & Research

Abstract

Games are often used in the classroom to teach mathematical and physical concepts. Yet the available activities used to introduce quantum mechanics are often overwhelming even to upper-level students. Further, the "games" in question range in focus and complexity from superficial introductions to games where quantum strategies result in decidedly nonclassical advantages, making it nearly impossible for people interested in quantum mechanics to have a simple introduction to the topic. In this talk, we introduce a straightforward and newly developed "Semiclassical Mastermind" based on the original version of mastermind but replace the colored pegs with 6 possible qubits (x+, x-, y+, y-, z+, z-). We allow the user to make 9 guesses with 1 final answer, forcing the user to make strategies to have the best chance of getting a correct answer. We report on the mathematical analysis of three strategies for play and conclude by previewing how a "quantum" player could potentially outperform even optimal "classical" players.

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"Semiclassical Mastermind"

Games are often used in the classroom to teach mathematical and physical concepts. Yet the available activities used to introduce quantum mechanics are often overwhelming even to upper-level students. Further, the "games" in question range in focus and complexity from superficial introductions to games where quantum strategies result in decidedly nonclassical advantages, making it nearly impossible for people interested in quantum mechanics to have a simple introduction to the topic. In this talk, we introduce a straightforward and newly developed "Semiclassical Mastermind" based on the original version of mastermind but replace the colored pegs with 6 possible qubits (x+, x-, y+, y-, z+, z-). We allow the user to make 9 guesses with 1 final answer, forcing the user to make strategies to have the best chance of getting a correct answer. We report on the mathematical analysis of three strategies for play and conclude by previewing how a "quantum" player could potentially outperform even optimal "classical" players.

 

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