Murray State University

Poster Title

Linking Soil Properties to Originally Wooded and Afforested Areas

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Horticulture

Minor

Chemistry

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Horticulture

2nd Student Minor

Art

Institution 22-23

Murray State University

KY House District #

5

KY Senate District #

1

Department

Hutson School of Agriculture

Abstract

Linking Soil Properties to Originally Wooded and Afforested Areas

Matthew Laun, Ashton Crowe

Mentor: I. P. Handayani

Hutson School of Agriculture Murray State University, KY, USA

Abstract

Afforestation, adding an artificial forest to a piece of land that has been barren of trees for a significant amount of time, has some seriously huge impacts on the environment. These effects can be seen as an increase in the soil organic matter, a decrease in compaction, and enhancement of porosity. Therefore, the soil can support more diverse microbes and fungal communities leading to better micro and macro nutrient transfers between plants. This research will aid in determining if the density of trees in an area, as well as if they are part of an afforested or original forest play a significant role in soil organic matter, bulk density, and porosity in relation to soil compaction within each soil management area. Samples were collected on October 11th and 12th of 2022 in four different sites. Two of these sites included originally wooded areas (Central Park’s disc golf course [A] and picnic area [B]) to be compared to an afforested wooded environment (Arboretum’s rain garden [C]) and a baseline control (Arboretum’s prairie [D]). Each site has a varying number of visitors per day, but the results have proven that human foot traffic is null in affecting the compaction of the soil management site. Overall, this research showed that Field C has the highest total porosity with an average of 62.59 %. The lowest total porosity is Field D with an average of 52.28 %. Field A has the highest soil water field capacity with an average of 28.58 %. Field D has the lowest soil water field capacity with an average of 15.74 %. This study will contribute to the knowledge of reforestation/afforestation efforts in providing future hope that our forests and ecosystems can be restored.

Keywords: Afforestation, Bulk density, Compaction, Human impact, Organic matter

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Linking Soil Properties to Originally Wooded and Afforested Areas

Linking Soil Properties to Originally Wooded and Afforested Areas

Matthew Laun, Ashton Crowe

Mentor: I. P. Handayani

Hutson School of Agriculture Murray State University, KY, USA

Abstract

Afforestation, adding an artificial forest to a piece of land that has been barren of trees for a significant amount of time, has some seriously huge impacts on the environment. These effects can be seen as an increase in the soil organic matter, a decrease in compaction, and enhancement of porosity. Therefore, the soil can support more diverse microbes and fungal communities leading to better micro and macro nutrient transfers between plants. This research will aid in determining if the density of trees in an area, as well as if they are part of an afforested or original forest play a significant role in soil organic matter, bulk density, and porosity in relation to soil compaction within each soil management area. Samples were collected on October 11th and 12th of 2022 in four different sites. Two of these sites included originally wooded areas (Central Park’s disc golf course [A] and picnic area [B]) to be compared to an afforested wooded environment (Arboretum’s rain garden [C]) and a baseline control (Arboretum’s prairie [D]). Each site has a varying number of visitors per day, but the results have proven that human foot traffic is null in affecting the compaction of the soil management site. Overall, this research showed that Field C has the highest total porosity with an average of 62.59 %. The lowest total porosity is Field D with an average of 52.28 %. Field A has the highest soil water field capacity with an average of 28.58 %. Field D has the lowest soil water field capacity with an average of 15.74 %. This study will contribute to the knowledge of reforestation/afforestation efforts in providing future hope that our forests and ecosystems can be restored.

Keywords: Afforestation, Bulk density, Compaction, Human impact, Organic matter