Northern Kentucky University

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nursing

Minor

Psychology

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Nursing

2nd Student Minor

Human Resources

Institution 22-23

Northern Kentucky University

KY House District #

78;88

KY Senate District #

4;6

Department

Nursing Department

Abstract

Postpartum depression (PPD) occurs in 13-19% of women worldwide, and is a stigmatized medical condition affecting maternal and infantile long term outcomes. The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to determine if women at high risk for PPD are affected by home visitation programs from discharge up to three years postpartum. CINHAL Ultimate, Google Scholar, and Medline databases were used. Current evidence supports the use of home-visitation programs for postpartum women to decrease the prevalence and the symptoms of PPD by allowing nurses access into homes to provide early intervention for PPD. In addition to providing care for prevention and treatment of PPD, nurses are able to educate mothers on proper infant care and provide additional resources for potential needs (car seats, formula, food stamps, etc.). Screening for PPD at least four times from 28 weeks prenatal up to 12 weeks postpartum is optimal for identifying and treating high risk women. The benefits of home visitation programs should be discussed during prenatal and postnatal appointments. In conclusion, home-visitation programs and frequent screenings should become the standard of care for prevention and treatment of postpartum depression. Future research should include how to generate use of home based visitation programs and feasibility of developing these programs as the standard of care for PPD.

Keywords: postpartum depression, infant outcomes, maternal outcomes, home healthcare, postpartum treatment, EDPS screening.

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Home Visitation to Prevent and Reduce Postpartum Depression

Postpartum depression (PPD) occurs in 13-19% of women worldwide, and is a stigmatized medical condition affecting maternal and infantile long term outcomes. The purpose of this evidence-based practice project was to determine if women at high risk for PPD are affected by home visitation programs from discharge up to three years postpartum. CINHAL Ultimate, Google Scholar, and Medline databases were used. Current evidence supports the use of home-visitation programs for postpartum women to decrease the prevalence and the symptoms of PPD by allowing nurses access into homes to provide early intervention for PPD. In addition to providing care for prevention and treatment of PPD, nurses are able to educate mothers on proper infant care and provide additional resources for potential needs (car seats, formula, food stamps, etc.). Screening for PPD at least four times from 28 weeks prenatal up to 12 weeks postpartum is optimal for identifying and treating high risk women. The benefits of home visitation programs should be discussed during prenatal and postnatal appointments. In conclusion, home-visitation programs and frequent screenings should become the standard of care for prevention and treatment of postpartum depression. Future research should include how to generate use of home based visitation programs and feasibility of developing these programs as the standard of care for PPD.

Keywords: postpartum depression, infant outcomes, maternal outcomes, home healthcare, postpartum treatment, EDPS screening.

 

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