Western Kentucky University

Poster Title

A Commodity Flow Study to Identify the Hazardous Materials Transported through Northern Kentucky, the Human Health Risks, and Needs for Hazardous Materials Transport Emergency Preparedness in Kentucky

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Public Health

2nd Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

2nd Student Major

Biology

Institution 22-23

Western Kentucky University

KY House District #

20;51

KY Senate District #

32;14

Department

Public Health

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the transport of hazardous materials, the risks to human health from transported hazardous commodities, and the emergency management and preparedness needs related to hazardous materials transport in Northern Kentucky. Components of this study included a placard survey, a fixed-facility survey, and an analysis of hazardous material transportation incidents. Hazardous materials placard surveys were conducted in the summer of 2022 to determine the types and frequency of specific hazardous commodities transported on the major interstates and highways throughout the Northern Kentucky region. Additionally, a fixed-facility survey consisting of 35 response items designed to collect data on the types, frequency, and routes of hazardous materials shipments and receipts was sent to local Tier II facilities. An analysis of hazardous materials incidents was also conducted in this study to determine locations of historical accidents that could pose a continued risk to human health, as well as determine locations of “hot spots” that require emergency preparedness planning and exercise development. Results of the study were used to document the hazardous materials identified during the study, the timing and frequency of transport, and the major hazardous materials risks observed during the study period. A major conclusion of the study is the need for a statewide database for hazardous materials transport that is accessible to emergency managers, first responders, and communities in preparation for hazardous materials emergencies. This system would enhance emergency preparedness, training, and response across Kentucky.

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A Commodity Flow Study to Identify the Hazardous Materials Transported through Northern Kentucky, the Human Health Risks, and Needs for Hazardous Materials Transport Emergency Preparedness in Kentucky

The purpose of this study was to assess the transport of hazardous materials, the risks to human health from transported hazardous commodities, and the emergency management and preparedness needs related to hazardous materials transport in Northern Kentucky. Components of this study included a placard survey, a fixed-facility survey, and an analysis of hazardous material transportation incidents. Hazardous materials placard surveys were conducted in the summer of 2022 to determine the types and frequency of specific hazardous commodities transported on the major interstates and highways throughout the Northern Kentucky region. Additionally, a fixed-facility survey consisting of 35 response items designed to collect data on the types, frequency, and routes of hazardous materials shipments and receipts was sent to local Tier II facilities. An analysis of hazardous materials incidents was also conducted in this study to determine locations of historical accidents that could pose a continued risk to human health, as well as determine locations of “hot spots” that require emergency preparedness planning and exercise development. Results of the study were used to document the hazardous materials identified during the study, the timing and frequency of transport, and the major hazardous materials risks observed during the study period. A major conclusion of the study is the need for a statewide database for hazardous materials transport that is accessible to emergency managers, first responders, and communities in preparation for hazardous materials emergencies. This system would enhance emergency preparedness, training, and response across Kentucky.