Presenter Information

Emma EscueFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Nursing

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

Prenatal care is essential for growth and development of the growing fetus, as well as the overall health of the expecting mother. Encouraging continuation of prenatal care is where it all starts, therefore care needs to be adaptive to the individual seeking treatment. Stress is something every pregnant woman experience, but increases greatly in women of minority, whether that be race, income or cultural differences. We as health care professionals must do our best to alleviate that stress for all expecting mothers, that starts with a trusting relationship and a support group. Evidence based research shows that minority women have a harder time developing connections with health care providers in a traditional care setting. It is important all women feel heard, feeling heard will empower them to seek more frequent care. Research has shown group care, bi-weekly, to be informative and beneficial for women of low socioeconomic status. The group setting provides a support group, a sense of belonging and ensures all women are getting equal care. This encourage mothers to be more involved in care, leading to better health outcomes for mother and baby.

Spring Scholars Week 2020 Event

Evidence Based Best Practices in Clinical Healthcare (Posters)

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Alternative Forms of Prenatal Care for Women of Low Socioeconomic Status

Prenatal care is essential for growth and development of the growing fetus, as well as the overall health of the expecting mother. Encouraging continuation of prenatal care is where it all starts, therefore care needs to be adaptive to the individual seeking treatment. Stress is something every pregnant woman experience, but increases greatly in women of minority, whether that be race, income or cultural differences. We as health care professionals must do our best to alleviate that stress for all expecting mothers, that starts with a trusting relationship and a support group. Evidence based research shows that minority women have a harder time developing connections with health care providers in a traditional care setting. It is important all women feel heard, feeling heard will empower them to seek more frequent care. Research has shown group care, bi-weekly, to be informative and beneficial for women of low socioeconomic status. The group setting provides a support group, a sense of belonging and ensures all women are getting equal care. This encourage mothers to be more involved in care, leading to better health outcomes for mother and baby.