JCSET | Projects in Biomathematics

Title

The Michaelis-Menten Model as a Stepping Stone

Presenter Information

Gabrielle KennedyFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Biomedical Sciences

Minor

Chemistry

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Maeve McCarthy

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Leonor Michaelis and Maud Leonara Menten developed perhaps on of the most crucial models in biochemistry and mathematical biology over a century ago. This model characterizing the rate of enzymatic catalysis now plays a vital role in pathogenesis research and much of cell biology research as enzymes dictate chemical signaling gradients for all living organisms. This model describes the very fundamental relationship where substrate and enzyme concentrations dictate the concentration of enzyme-substrate complexes which then determine the catalytic rate of the reaction to form the end product. From this key insight where the substrate and enzyme form a complex driving the final reaction, Michaelis and Menten could find the maximum reaction rate. This then translates into the well known hyperbolic nature of enzymatic catalysis and paved the way for future models like the Briggs-Haldane model and Lineweaver-Burke Plot. In this presentation, I will present the mathematical significant of the Michaelis-Menten model and how the Lineweaver-Burke and Briggs-Haldane mathematical descriptions expanded greatly upon this first system.

Spring Scholars Week 2021 Event

Principles of Biomathematics

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The Michaelis-Menten Model as a Stepping Stone

Leonor Michaelis and Maud Leonara Menten developed perhaps on of the most crucial models in biochemistry and mathematical biology over a century ago. This model characterizing the rate of enzymatic catalysis now plays a vital role in pathogenesis research and much of cell biology research as enzymes dictate chemical signaling gradients for all living organisms. This model describes the very fundamental relationship where substrate and enzyme concentrations dictate the concentration of enzyme-substrate complexes which then determine the catalytic rate of the reaction to form the end product. From this key insight where the substrate and enzyme form a complex driving the final reaction, Michaelis and Menten could find the maximum reaction rate. This then translates into the well known hyperbolic nature of enzymatic catalysis and paved the way for future models like the Briggs-Haldane model and Lineweaver-Burke Plot. In this presentation, I will present the mathematical significant of the Michaelis-Menten model and how the Lineweaver-Burke and Briggs-Haldane mathematical descriptions expanded greatly upon this first system.