The Office of Research and Creative Activity: General Poster Session

Presenter Information

Chelsea CarterFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Liberal Arts

Minor

Creative Writing

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Barbara Cobb; Dr. Carrie Jerrell; Dr. Joshua Adair

Presentation Format

Poster Presentation

Abstract/Description

In the Black community, there is an unspoken understanding about Black people going to the doctor with a runny nose, and leaving in a body bag. A recent article published by The Oprah Magazine demonstrates that racism is rampant in the United States healthcare system, and it is taking the lives of Black women at an alarmingly disproportionate rate (Stallings, 2018). When seeking medical treatment, many Black women are at the mercy of doctors who possess an implicit bias against Black women. Simply put, implicit bias describes the phenomenon in which people behave and treat others based on negative preconceptions they have about other people, even though they are not intentionally trying to do so. Because of this implicit bias, Black women have every reason to be scared of medical professionals, and their distrust is justifiable. A growing body of research and testimony gives evidence of Black women’s mistreatment due to their race, and the disparity in quality of care between Black and non-Black women widens, especially for pregnant Black women.

In this presentation, I will investigate the current injustices against Black women in the healthcare system and address the health disparities that are exclusive to Black women. I will hypothesize what steps need to be taken to abolish the health disparities that Black women face when seeking medical attention.

Spring Scholars Week 2021 Event

Other (Please write in)

Other Scholars Week Event

LBA 438 Seminar in Liberal Arts

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In with a runny nose, Out in a body bag: Why is it so difficult for Black women to leave the hospital alive?

In the Black community, there is an unspoken understanding about Black people going to the doctor with a runny nose, and leaving in a body bag. A recent article published by The Oprah Magazine demonstrates that racism is rampant in the United States healthcare system, and it is taking the lives of Black women at an alarmingly disproportionate rate (Stallings, 2018). When seeking medical treatment, many Black women are at the mercy of doctors who possess an implicit bias against Black women. Simply put, implicit bias describes the phenomenon in which people behave and treat others based on negative preconceptions they have about other people, even though they are not intentionally trying to do so. Because of this implicit bias, Black women have every reason to be scared of medical professionals, and their distrust is justifiable. A growing body of research and testimony gives evidence of Black women’s mistreatment due to their race, and the disparity in quality of care between Black and non-Black women widens, especially for pregnant Black women.

In this presentation, I will investigate the current injustices against Black women in the healthcare system and address the health disparities that are exclusive to Black women. I will hypothesize what steps need to be taken to abolish the health disparities that Black women face when seeking medical attention.

 

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