Presenter Information

Danielle ToneyFollow

Academic Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

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Major

Japanese

Minor

Music

List all Project Mentors & Advisor(s)

Dr. Riegler; Dr. Harrison

Presentation Format

Oral Presentation

Abstract/Description

Danielle Toney

Graduating in May, Danielle is a Japanese major with a minor in Music. Danielle has been studying Japanese for 6 years, and went to Doshisha University in Kyoto for two semesters in 2019 for an intensive study abroad program. Danielle has been active in Murray State’s Japanese Club for 4 years, which includes being Vice President in Fall of 2020. Danielle is also active in Murray State’s Japanese Language Table and practices speaking Japanese weekly with colleagues and friends. After graduation, Danielle will return to Kyoto to study Music Composition at Kyoto City University of Arts.

The Music of Japanese Animation

The developmental procedures of composing music for Japanese animation are widely unknown by American and Japanese audiences. Due to the limited awareness of this process, my project seeks to expose audiences to be more aware of the intricate methods of music writing for Japanese animation in. My thesis will allow people to be receptive of the process for composing music for animated media, examples of a well-known Japanese composer is analyzed, and solutions regarding the issue of awareness are addressed. Music excerpts from animated films such as Spirited Away (千と千尋の神隠し) and Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea (崖の上のポニョ) which were composed by Joe Hisaishi, known for writing music for Studio Ghibli films in Japan, are analyzed and examined. The process of composing music for Japanese animation, and the result of the final score is just as important as the visual process for producing Japanese animated media. If people forget about what goes into the process of writing music for animated media, then the entire production loses its value. It is imperative that we continue to be mindful of what happens behind the scenes in regard to the aural methods taken to produce Japanese animation.

Advisor Professor Harrison

Spring Scholars Week 2021 Event

GTL 400 Senior Colloquium

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The Music of Japanese Animation

Danielle Toney

Graduating in May, Danielle is a Japanese major with a minor in Music. Danielle has been studying Japanese for 6 years, and went to Doshisha University in Kyoto for two semesters in 2019 for an intensive study abroad program. Danielle has been active in Murray State’s Japanese Club for 4 years, which includes being Vice President in Fall of 2020. Danielle is also active in Murray State’s Japanese Language Table and practices speaking Japanese weekly with colleagues and friends. After graduation, Danielle will return to Kyoto to study Music Composition at Kyoto City University of Arts.

The Music of Japanese Animation

The developmental procedures of composing music for Japanese animation are widely unknown by American and Japanese audiences. Due to the limited awareness of this process, my project seeks to expose audiences to be more aware of the intricate methods of music writing for Japanese animation in. My thesis will allow people to be receptive of the process for composing music for animated media, examples of a well-known Japanese composer is analyzed, and solutions regarding the issue of awareness are addressed. Music excerpts from animated films such as Spirited Away (千と千尋の神隠し) and Ponyo on the Cliff by the Sea (崖の上のポニョ) which were composed by Joe Hisaishi, known for writing music for Studio Ghibli films in Japan, are analyzed and examined. The process of composing music for Japanese animation, and the result of the final score is just as important as the visual process for producing Japanese animated media. If people forget about what goes into the process of writing music for animated media, then the entire production loses its value. It is imperative that we continue to be mindful of what happens behind the scenes in regard to the aural methods taken to produce Japanese animation.

Advisor Professor Harrison

 

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