Eastern Kentucky University

Poster Title

Appalachian Dialect and Perceived Intelligence

Institution

Eastern Kentucky University

Abstract

People in Appalachia often use a distinctive, easily recognizable accent. In the current study, I hope to determine whether or not a person speaking with an Appalachian dialect is perceived as less intelligent than the same person speaking in Standard American English. Also, I hope to discover whether students will be less willing to take a class from the person speaking with an Appalachian dialect, and if they have a lower level of respect for the person speaking in Appalachian dialect. It will also be interesting to see if the participant’s identification as being Appalachian has an effect on scores. Undergraduate students at Eastern Kentucky University will hear a tape recording of the same person speaking in one of the aforementioned ways. They will then rate the person on several qualities. The ones of interest are perceived intelligence, willingness to take a class from the person on the recording, and degree of respect for the person on the recording. I expect that when the person speaks with an Appalachian dialect he will be perceived as less intelligent than when he speaks Standard American English. I also expect the speaker with an Appalachian dialect to receive lower levels of respect, and participants will be less willing to take a class from him.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Appalachian Dialect and Perceived Intelligence

People in Appalachia often use a distinctive, easily recognizable accent. In the current study, I hope to determine whether or not a person speaking with an Appalachian dialect is perceived as less intelligent than the same person speaking in Standard American English. Also, I hope to discover whether students will be less willing to take a class from the person speaking with an Appalachian dialect, and if they have a lower level of respect for the person speaking in Appalachian dialect. It will also be interesting to see if the participant’s identification as being Appalachian has an effect on scores. Undergraduate students at Eastern Kentucky University will hear a tape recording of the same person speaking in one of the aforementioned ways. They will then rate the person on several qualities. The ones of interest are perceived intelligence, willingness to take a class from the person on the recording, and degree of respect for the person on the recording. I expect that when the person speaks with an Appalachian dialect he will be perceived as less intelligent than when he speaks Standard American English. I also expect the speaker with an Appalachian dialect to receive lower levels of respect, and participants will be less willing to take a class from him.