Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Impact of Purple Sweet Potato Powder on Bone Mineral Content of Ovariectomized Rats

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

Oxidative damages might be partially responsible for bone loss associated with osteoporosis. Purple sweet potato is rich in anthocyanins and other antioxidants. The objective of this study was to determine if consumption of purple sweet potato powder would affect the bone mineral content of ovariectomized rats. Female SD rats (9 month old) were either ovariectomized or sham-operated before they were randomly assigned into 6 treatment groups. Rats in group A were sham-operated but those in other groups were all ovariectomized. Groups A and B were fed the AIN93M diet, but groups C, D and E were fed the AIN93M diet with 5%, 10% or 15% of the corn starch replaced by equal amount of purple sweet potato powder, respectively. Purple sweet potatoes from a North Carolina farm were steam cooked at 200 F for 1 hr before the skin was removed, mashed and freeze dried. Group A was fed ad lib, but the amounts of diets given to other groups were restricted to the average intake of Group A. The rats were fed their assigned diets for 6 weeks before they were sacrificed. The bone mineral content for group A was higher than for other groups but the group fed 10% purple sweet potato powder had bone mineral content similar to that of group A. Group fed 15% purple sweet potato powder had diarrhea and uterine inflammation These results confirmed that ovariectomy surgery significantly reduced bone mineral content. However, consumption of purple sweet potato powder at 10% of the total diet helped to maintain the bone mineral content close to the sham-operated rats. These results indicate that purple sweet potato powder helped to prevent bone loss caused by ovariectomy. Excessive consumption of purple sweet potato powder (15% of the diet) caused digestive disorders and was not protective against bone loss.

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Impact of Purple Sweet Potato Powder on Bone Mineral Content of Ovariectomized Rats

Oxidative damages might be partially responsible for bone loss associated with osteoporosis. Purple sweet potato is rich in anthocyanins and other antioxidants. The objective of this study was to determine if consumption of purple sweet potato powder would affect the bone mineral content of ovariectomized rats. Female SD rats (9 month old) were either ovariectomized or sham-operated before they were randomly assigned into 6 treatment groups. Rats in group A were sham-operated but those in other groups were all ovariectomized. Groups A and B were fed the AIN93M diet, but groups C, D and E were fed the AIN93M diet with 5%, 10% or 15% of the corn starch replaced by equal amount of purple sweet potato powder, respectively. Purple sweet potatoes from a North Carolina farm were steam cooked at 200 F for 1 hr before the skin was removed, mashed and freeze dried. Group A was fed ad lib, but the amounts of diets given to other groups were restricted to the average intake of Group A. The rats were fed their assigned diets for 6 weeks before they were sacrificed. The bone mineral content for group A was higher than for other groups but the group fed 10% purple sweet potato powder had bone mineral content similar to that of group A. Group fed 15% purple sweet potato powder had diarrhea and uterine inflammation These results confirmed that ovariectomy surgery significantly reduced bone mineral content. However, consumption of purple sweet potato powder at 10% of the total diet helped to maintain the bone mineral content close to the sham-operated rats. These results indicate that purple sweet potato powder helped to prevent bone loss caused by ovariectomy. Excessive consumption of purple sweet potato powder (15% of the diet) caused digestive disorders and was not protective against bone loss.