Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Growing Worldwide Genotypes of Hot Pepper in Kentucky

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

Seeds of twenty-nine (29) genotypes from Capsicum species (Family: Solanaceae) of hot pepper were planted in the greenhouse to represent four hot pepper species: Capsicum annuum L., C. baccatum L., C. chinense Jacq., and C. pubescens Ruiz & Pav. Seedlings of 60 days old were planted in the field under normal agricultural practices in a randomized complete block design. At harvest, fruits were screened for their antioxidants contents (vitamin C, β-carotene, and phenols), early maturity, color, fruit length, width, and fruit wall thickness. The main objective of this investigation was to test character stability of candidate genotypes for use in commercial pepper production and as parents in breeding for fruit early maturity and quality characteristics. Hot pepper producers look for plant varieties that yield large quantities of high-quality peppers. Characteristics of interest included yield, fruit nutritional composition and shape. Concentrations of β-carotene in pepper fruits were greatest in orange and red fruits (94 and 165 mg g-1fresh fruits, respectively), compared to green fruits (38 mg g-1 fresh fruits), indicating that concentration of β-carotene is a function of mature fruit color. β-carotene levels found in red peppers were about four orders of magnitude than that found in green peppers. The project could help KSU in meeting the objective of assisting limited-resource farmers in finding alternatives to tobacco production. This area of research could provide an entrepreneurial niche market for small farmers. Many farmers could be able to grow and produce new Capsicum cultivars for use as a cash crop.

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Growing Worldwide Genotypes of Hot Pepper in Kentucky

Seeds of twenty-nine (29) genotypes from Capsicum species (Family: Solanaceae) of hot pepper were planted in the greenhouse to represent four hot pepper species: Capsicum annuum L., C. baccatum L., C. chinense Jacq., and C. pubescens Ruiz & Pav. Seedlings of 60 days old were planted in the field under normal agricultural practices in a randomized complete block design. At harvest, fruits were screened for their antioxidants contents (vitamin C, β-carotene, and phenols), early maturity, color, fruit length, width, and fruit wall thickness. The main objective of this investigation was to test character stability of candidate genotypes for use in commercial pepper production and as parents in breeding for fruit early maturity and quality characteristics. Hot pepper producers look for plant varieties that yield large quantities of high-quality peppers. Characteristics of interest included yield, fruit nutritional composition and shape. Concentrations of β-carotene in pepper fruits were greatest in orange and red fruits (94 and 165 mg g-1fresh fruits, respectively), compared to green fruits (38 mg g-1 fresh fruits), indicating that concentration of β-carotene is a function of mature fruit color. β-carotene levels found in red peppers were about four orders of magnitude than that found in green peppers. The project could help KSU in meeting the objective of assisting limited-resource farmers in finding alternatives to tobacco production. This area of research could provide an entrepreneurial niche market for small farmers. Many farmers could be able to grow and produce new Capsicum cultivars for use as a cash crop.