Poster Title

Inclusive Ensembles: Differentiating for the Singer on the Autism Spectrum

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Senior

Major

Music Education

Institution

Murray State University

KY House District #

27

KY Senate District #

5

Department

Music Dept.

Abstract

Exceptional children belong in music classrooms. Music ensemble directors need to overcome complex challenges to meet the goal of inclusion because ensembles often contain a mixture of ages, grades, social and intellectual development stages, musical skills, and a wide variety of diverse learning needs. This study focuses on how a choral ensemble director may create an inclusive environment for students on the Autism Spectrum.

This study reviewed current research on creating inclusive rehearsal environments. Analysis revealed varied methods for differentiation including modified/adapted scores that make use of color-coding, personalized parts, and symbolic notation; choral ensemble formats, such as self-contained choirs, partner choirs, and mainstream choirs; and student-centered instruction using project-based learning. In conclusion, modifications and adaptations can be made to the components of instruction (content, process, product, affect, and environment) in order to differentiate instruction to best meet individual student’s readiness needs, interests, and learning profiles. Individualized instruction can be crucial for the success of a student on the spectrum participating in a choral ensemble.

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Inclusive Ensembles: Differentiating for the Singer on the Autism Spectrum

Exceptional children belong in music classrooms. Music ensemble directors need to overcome complex challenges to meet the goal of inclusion because ensembles often contain a mixture of ages, grades, social and intellectual development stages, musical skills, and a wide variety of diverse learning needs. This study focuses on how a choral ensemble director may create an inclusive environment for students on the Autism Spectrum.

This study reviewed current research on creating inclusive rehearsal environments. Analysis revealed varied methods for differentiation including modified/adapted scores that make use of color-coding, personalized parts, and symbolic notation; choral ensemble formats, such as self-contained choirs, partner choirs, and mainstream choirs; and student-centered instruction using project-based learning. In conclusion, modifications and adaptations can be made to the components of instruction (content, process, product, affect, and environment) in order to differentiate instruction to best meet individual student’s readiness needs, interests, and learning profiles. Individualized instruction can be crucial for the success of a student on the spectrum participating in a choral ensemble.