Poster Title

Genetic interactions of tRNA anticodon loop modification genes TRM732 and TRM734 in yeast

Grade Level at Time of Presentation

Junior

Major

Chemistry

Minor

Biology

Institution

Northern Kentucky University

KY House District #

69

KY Senate District #

11

Department

Chemistry & Biochemistry

Abstract

The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is among the most commonly used organisms as a model system to study cellular biology. Yeast is a low-cost and rapid growing organism, with a genome which is easily manipulated, making it essential to studying factors such as genetic interactions. Yeast is a powerful system for the study of genes that are required for cells to modify cellular molecules such as transfer RNA (tRNA), which are carriers that assist in the physical production of proteins. One type of tRNA modification is the addition of extra chemical groups, and various genes, such as TRM7, TRM732, and TRM734 are required for the process. Previous studies have indicated that the effects of removing genes needed for the addition of these extra chemical groups to tRNA can be detrimental to the organism’s viability. These studies then provided the basis for human studies, where mutations in the corresponding human genes for adding chemical groups to tRNA were linked to mental disability, type II diabetes, or polycystic ovary syndrome. This study involves knocking out tRNA modification genes in combination with other genes to identify any possible relationships. Thus far, one new possible relationship has been detected between a tRNA modification gene and a gene involved in an unrelated process.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Genetic interactions of tRNA anticodon loop modification genes TRM732 and TRM734 in yeast

The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is among the most commonly used organisms as a model system to study cellular biology. Yeast is a low-cost and rapid growing organism, with a genome which is easily manipulated, making it essential to studying factors such as genetic interactions. Yeast is a powerful system for the study of genes that are required for cells to modify cellular molecules such as transfer RNA (tRNA), which are carriers that assist in the physical production of proteins. One type of tRNA modification is the addition of extra chemical groups, and various genes, such as TRM7, TRM732, and TRM734 are required for the process. Previous studies have indicated that the effects of removing genes needed for the addition of these extra chemical groups to tRNA can be detrimental to the organism’s viability. These studies then provided the basis for human studies, where mutations in the corresponding human genes for adding chemical groups to tRNA were linked to mental disability, type II diabetes, or polycystic ovary syndrome. This study involves knocking out tRNA modification genes in combination with other genes to identify any possible relationships. Thus far, one new possible relationship has been detected between a tRNA modification gene and a gene involved in an unrelated process.