Kentucky State University

Poster Title

Metabolic Syndrome Among Students Attending a Historically Black College: Prevalence and Gender Differences

Institution

Kentucky State University

Abstract

There are limited data on the prevalence rate of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) among young African Americans (AA). We report the prevalence of and gender differences in the components of MetS in a predominantly young AA sample population from a Historically Black College and University (HBCU). First year college students (average age 19.8 years), (n=218 females and 158 males) attending Kentucky State University, Frankfort with no prior diagnosis of illness participated in the cross sectional study. Anthropometric screenings included measurement of height, weight, waist circumference and body mass index (BMI). Clinical screenings included measurement of blood pressure and determination of fasting lipid and glucose concentrations. MetS was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) definition. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) scores on the Means procedure were used to examine differences between genders for all the screening parameters. Fisher’s exact chisquare tests were used to analyze the point prevalence of MetS criteria. Most prevalent criteria observed were low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (37.3%) and elevated fasting glucose (22.1%). Statistically more males were found to have elevated fasting glucose and high blood pressure than females, while more females had high waist circumference. Overall prevalence of MetS in the total sample was 12%. HBCUs offer a unique opportunity to monitor and address the risks for MetS in a predominantly young AA population. Peculiar gender differences in glucose function and blood pressure management need to be addressed in designing of intervention strategies.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 

Metabolic Syndrome Among Students Attending a Historically Black College: Prevalence and Gender Differences

There are limited data on the prevalence rate of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) among young African Americans (AA). We report the prevalence of and gender differences in the components of MetS in a predominantly young AA sample population from a Historically Black College and University (HBCU). First year college students (average age 19.8 years), (n=218 females and 158 males) attending Kentucky State University, Frankfort with no prior diagnosis of illness participated in the cross sectional study. Anthropometric screenings included measurement of height, weight, waist circumference and body mass index (BMI). Clinical screenings included measurement of blood pressure and determination of fasting lipid and glucose concentrations. MetS was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program’s Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP ATP III) definition. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) scores on the Means procedure were used to examine differences between genders for all the screening parameters. Fisher’s exact chisquare tests were used to analyze the point prevalence of MetS criteria. Most prevalent criteria observed were low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (37.3%) and elevated fasting glucose (22.1%). Statistically more males were found to have elevated fasting glucose and high blood pressure than females, while more females had high waist circumference. Overall prevalence of MetS in the total sample was 12%. HBCUs offer a unique opportunity to monitor and address the risks for MetS in a predominantly young AA population. Peculiar gender differences in glucose function and blood pressure management need to be addressed in designing of intervention strategies.